"Home Away from Home"

Canvassing HWS Events

HWS Summer Academy 2017

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The HWS Summer Academy is a yearly summer opportunity for Geneva High School juniors and seniors to engage in college academic work and activities for a period of two weeks. Students are guided by college student mentors, receive instruction and mentorship from professors and staff, and get to learn more about the college application process, college study strategies and college search process. The curriculum has expanded to include classes in architecture, computer programming, psychology, chemistry, sociology, environmental studies, social justice and dance. All in all the program seeks to prepare students for the networking, presentation, study skills, and application process expected for college applicants/students. The program is possible thanks to the generosity of the Wyckoff Family Foundation. It has been a huge success and has substantial support from HWS.

The Summer Academy is an academic program that combines lectures, discussions projects, presentation, field trips and workshops. It was started 13 years ago by Professor Boyer and has segued to new different ways, and this year we had 20 rising juniors and seniors who may have some kind of barriers…and this is an exposure program to college that says yes you can go and there is a way and you should be in college”
– Shayne Feinberg, Program Coordinator at the Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning

 

 

 

Hobart and William Smith Colleges   Alumni Reunion of 2017 – Farewell to President Gearan and Mary Gearan

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President Gearan’s accomplishments, in partnership with the HWS community, are too many to mention in one blog post. But as the office of Intercultural Affairs we would like to thank President Gearan for his dedicated support for inclusive excellence on campus as well as a noticeable increase in diversity across many identities and backgrounds. Under his leadership  the Office of Diversity and Inclusion was established with the mission to ensure adequate resources and attention is available to promote and sustain a diverse campus. Moreover, President Gearan led an effort to establish a Culture of Respect on campus which will continue to encourage a campus climate where prejudice and hate are not acceptable and where leadership is encouraged to counter them with the support of the colleges. “From class, to race, to sexuality – underneath all of these challenges to building a sense of community is the imperative for greater respect.” His Inclusive Excellence vision included creating “a learning community that is guided by the principles of equity, social justice, cultural competence, and engaged citizenship.” And so among the numerous other accomplishments of President Gearan, he prioritized and took to heart the need for inclusivity and communicating the benefits of diversity and respect. We thank both President Gearan and Mrs. Gearan for their personal involvement with HWS students as well as students in the Geneva school district. We wish the Gearan family the best in their future life. We will miss them! You can view videos of their final farewell during Alumni weekend below!

 

 

Hobart and William Smith Colleges   Commencement 2017

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President Bill Clinton took the time during his commencement speech to address the Class of 2017 as political agents who have growing civic responsibilities on their shoulders. He spoke to the importance and accompanying benefits of diversity and inclusivity, and addressed the current divisive climate of our country. Bill Clinton asked the Class of 2017 and their friends and family “Do you believe constant combat works better to produce prosperity, harmony, peace — or are diverse networks of people working together more likely to produce those good ends?” His message was followed up by speeches of student representatives of HWS, Sydney Gomez WS’17 and Matthew Skinner H’17. Both spoke to the need of being better and more authentic listeners, being more empathetic of others unlike ourselves, and of the open doors students had available during their time here at the colleges. Together these speeches spoke to the importance of collectivity, supporting one another during times of need, and being more receptive and aware of diverse inclusivity. A great awesome note on which for Class of 2017 to say goodbye!

Below is a link to the IC’s full photo collection of Commencement 2017!

Commencement 2017 https://goo.gl/photos/epE8CVao42QenMtLA

IC Commencement 2017 Lunch and Dinner https://goo.gl/photos/bVpMSZcVx5S538Hz6

Girl Up & PeaceAction NY’s Hunger Banquet

On Sunday, April 30, Girl Up and PeaceAction NY hosted a Hunger Banquet for HWS. The Oxfam Hunger Banquet is a memorable, interactive event that brings hunger and poverty issues to life. The clubs were happy to see many students attending this event to learn more about the poverty issues worldwide. To learn more or donate to this foundation, check our their website here! If you would like to see additional photos and videos check out their album!

8th Annual The Arts Experience

Every year the Finger Lakes, Inc. and HWS Colleges are pleased to present The 8th Annual Arts Experience: A Festival Celebrating Inclusion & the Arts. This year, the theme was Planting Seeds. This took place from April 3 – April 7, and the Gala was on Thursday, April 6 in the Vandervort Room in the Scandling Center. This was an art exhibit featuring local artists and participatory dancing with Cadence Whittier. HWS Studio Arts Collective students provided opportunities to create art from found materials. The William Smith College A Capella group, Three Miles Lost performed, as well as the Youth Voice Band.

Pride’s Gayla Dinner

On Friday, April 14, the PRIDE club hosted their annual Gayla Dinner at the Barlett Theatre to bring together members of the HWS community and recognize the work of Pride over the past year. This dinner is an exciting occasion for all those involved, and provides HWS students and faculty to gather together at year’s end. Samantha Vega, a drag queen based out of Rochester, hosted the event and performed for all the attendees.

Pride’s prizes were Oscar themed and IC received the best production design award. The IC was honored to receive an award at the event and will treasure all the memories made at this fabulous annual gathering.

HipNotiQ’s Step Show

On Saturday, April 15, the HipNotiQ’s hosted their Step Show. The Hip-NotiQ’s is an organization and team devoted to creating a positive energy on campus by merging the arts of dance and step to create unique routines and performances.

In stepping, the body is used as an instrument to create intricate rhythms and sounds though a combination of footsteps, claps and the spoken word. Stepping is based on a long and rich tradition in African-based communities that use movement, words and sounds to communicate allegiance to a group.

If you’re interested in joining the team, check out their website.

Sankofa’s Charity Ball

Sankofa, the HWS Black Student Union, recently hosted its annual Charity Ball which raised over $2,000 and awarded scholarships to Geneva High School students. The theme of this year’s Charity Ball was “Black Diamonds” to represent the strength, beauty and uniqueness of the Black diaspora. The Ball took place Saturday, March 26 at the Geneva Ramada Lakefront. German Veras H’17 MC’ed the event.

Award-winning artist, writer, performer, educator, and activist Dominique Christina served as keynote speaker. Christina holds four national titles in the three years she has been competing in slam poetry. The Charity Ball also featured a dinner, live performances, dancing and a silent auction.

For more photos of the event, click here! To read more, click here!

Scholar’s Day at HWS

Intercultural Affair’s Director Alejandra Molina and Pamela Icyeza welcomed students and families who attended the Academic Department and Campus Resource Fair on Saturday, April 8. HWS encourages all admitted students to visit campus where they’ll be introduced to the Colleges through the eyes of our students. Students gain a better understanding of life at HWS is actually like. Visiting students and families have the opportunity to attend various panels, meet with faculty and staff members, participate in full campus tours, residence hall hours and visual arts tours.

To read more, click here! For more photos, click here!

“Saturday was a lot of fun! It’s always great speaking to potential students and exposing them to the many different student run clubs and through this, showing them the importance of the IC to the student population!” Pamela Icyeza

International Student Association’s Annual Dinner

ISA hosted their annual dinner on March 31 at the Ramada on the Geneva lakefront. HWS students and faculty attended for a night filled with music, dancing and fun. There were impressive performers, a delicious buffet style dinner, and various speakers.

For students interested in participating in events with international students, you can attend this Friday’s International Café at the Chaplain’s house. For more information on how HWS supports their international students, check out our website.

For more photos of the event, click here.

Banning Refugees Program

Activist, Speaker and author of Bosnian Immigrants visited Hobart and William Smith this past Friday, March 24 to speak about her book, as well as the topic of immigration and refugees. These conversations are important to have, especially during our current political situation. It’s crucial to listen to other perspectives and become informed on every aspect of the situation.

This event was hosted by the One-on-One Friendship Club, a service club that relies on a video calling platform to connect young Indonesians to youth in other cultures to promote peace, non-violence and social justice. Their mission is to promote social justice and to provide a network for working collaboratively among individuals of diverse cultures as well as furthering our understanding of world cultures, uniting cultural differences, enhancing leadership skills, and creating a discourse that addresses issues revolving around social justice. They do this by skyping with students in Indonesia weekly in order to help teach them English as well as creating and holding events that discuss cross-cultural issues and how to address and go about working with people of different backgrounds positively and productively. The club meets every Monday at 7pm in the Demearest reading room on the first floor for anyone interested in attending.

One on One Friendship was proud to host Aisa Purak as our speaker on Friday. Our club promotes cross-cultural engagement and conversations as we help teach students in Indonesia English. We believe that having serious conversations about cross-cultural issues and being able to understand and accept those of different backgrounds is extremely important. Asia Purak, a Bosnian refugee, was able to tell us about her own experiences as a refugee and how that has impacted her. Everyone there got to understand how impactful it is to be torn away from one’s own country and, as being a Muslim, Purak was able to tell us why religious differences in this country, especially coming from refugees, is crucial to creating acceptance of others. We were so glad to have hosted her at HWS and hope to continue promoting cross-cultural friendly dialogues! Carly Kelly WS, Co-Founder of One-on-One Friendship Club

CSA’s Masquerade Ball

Every year, the Caribbean Student’s Association on campus hosts their annual Masquerade Ball and invites the HWS community to participate in celebrating the caribbean culture, enjoy traditional food and dance, and spend time with friends. The event this year took place at the Belhurst Castle on Saturday, March 25 from 5 to 8 p.m.

The theme this year is “Whine ‘N Dine,” which references the Caribbean dance from called whining. Various live performances included FuturPointe from Rochester, NY, and the Brazilian dance group Samba Novo from NYC.

All proceeds from the event were donated to a CSA Scholarship Fund at the Center for Global Education that provides assistance to students who are studying abroad.

Students can become involved with CSA by attending weekly meetings hosted at the IC on Thursdays from 7-8 p.m. For additional photos from the event check out this link Masquerade Ball 2017 Photos

Hillel HWS Shabbat

Shabbat, or the Jewish Sabbath, is observed from a few minutes before sunset on Friday evening until the appearance of three stars in the sky on Saturday night. Shabbat is ushered in by lighting candles and reciting a blessing. Shabbat observance traditionally entails three festive meals: in the evening, in the early afternoon and late in the afternoon. The evening meal typically begins with a blessing called kiddish and another blessing recited over two loaves of challah bread.

“HWShabbat 2017 was a huge success!  The theme of the event – and the reason we changed the name from Shabbat 250 to HWShabbat – was community, and the evening allowed us to come together as a community and to celebrate the idea of community.  The Jewish community on campus enjoyed sharing our Shabbat traditions with friends and colleagues from other faith traditions, and everyone learned about the idea of Shabbat – the idea of taking time away from our to-do lists and schedules to do something that feeds our souls.  We honored President Gearan for his service to the Jewish community, and presented him with a gift engraved with the Jewish teaching “L’dor vaDor,” which means “From Generation to Generation.”  This is an idea in Judaism that we have an obligation to plant for future generations just as prior generations planted for us.  President Gearan’s work in starting the Abbe Center exemplifies this teaching, and we were thrilled to be able to honor him.” Julianne Miller, Director, Abbe Center for Jewish Life and Hillel Adviser

See more photos of the Shabbat dinner here.

For more information on the Jewish life at HWS, visit their website here!

William Smith Walkout

On March 8th, otherwise known as International Women’s Day, an International Women’s Strike took place in locations all throughout the world. Women in various international locations participated in a strike in the form of walk-outs, protests, occupations & blockades. The women of Geneva, New York and other neighboring cities joined this action towards change by assembling at noon in front of Congressman Tom Reed’s Geneva office. Strikes were open to all ages and genders to have people stand in solidarity for women.

William Smith also participated in a Walkout where HWS students met outside the Performing Arts Center at 11:30 to walk downtown and protest at Tom Reed’s. This was a call for collaboration to support the Geneva Women’s Assembly.

At least 200 students gathered in front of the PAC to walk downtown in solidarity to Tom Reed’s office. By one o’clock several hundred people had gathered on the sidewalk. Students and individuals alike stood up in front of the crowd and spoke on why they strike; varying from immigration to violence against women to reproductive rights. In that moment, we found that we are stronger together. And together we have the opportunity to voice our opinions and stand together in solidarity. Brittany MacLeod WS’17

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International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women and commemorates the movement for women’s rights. This day has been observed since the early 1900’s, and is a collective day of global celebration and a call for gender parity.

To celebrate incredible women and their accomplishments, the IC and GirlUp hosted “Mothers and Daughters Across Borders” featuring Marzia Ahmadi and Nagina Ahmadi WS’20 and Celia Pérez and Marilú Segura WS’07. It’s important to hear stories of women, particularly those who find themselves forces many times to cross geographic, identity and political borders.

For more photos of the 2017 celebration at HWS, click here.

An African Experience: Remembering Our Roots

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Wednesday, February 22, the IC hosted a panel entitled “An African Experience: Remembering Our Roots” at the Bartlett Theatre. The panel was moderated by Joshua Kolapo, the Area Director of Residential Education, and the panelists consisted of Provost and Dean of Faculty Titilayo Ufomato, French and Francophone Studies Professor Kanate Dahouda, Interim Chief Diversity Officer Solomé Rose, and Magdy Gad ’19 and Djeneba Ball ’20.

The panel worked to inform HWS students about the African continent, learn about the different African countries, identities, histories, and African and African-American identities.

Multicultural Career and Networking Conference

On February 10-11, 2017, HWS alums returned to campus to participate in a Multicultural Career and Networking Conference for current students. There were various panels and programs throughout the day, but the conference began on Friday, February 10 at 5pm with “Defining Success in the Workplace,” which was a conversation with seniors regarding the workplace culture, your personal sure north, and how the rules of work may apply to you. This was facilitated by former Trustee Margarita Ramos WS’85. Saturday morning’s activities began at 10am with various workshops and panels, some of which included “Life After HWS,” “Non-Profit Careers,” “Business Careers,” and “Grad School/Law School.” There was an additional networking session and REAL talk with Alums.

The Keynote Speaker of the event was the honorable Laura G. Douglas WS’79 who now works as the Justice of the Bronx Country Supreme Court and Supervising Judge of the Bronx County.

Only some of the organizations included The Economist, SUNY ESF, NYC Dept. of Education and Bank of America.

Click here for more photos of the event!

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HWS Club Expo

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The Club Expo is a great way to see what clubs are available on campus, and what you might be interested in joining. The Spring semester club expo was held in the Vandervort Room, and club leaders and members set up tables to invite new members to join. Clubs are a wonderful way to get involved on campus, gain a sense of community and connection, and really just to make more friends! If you’re interested and looking for more information about clubs, visit the Student Activities website to see how you can get involved.

International Student Association’s Sit In & Write In

In protest of the current Trump Administration’s Executive Order, the ISA hosted a Sit In and Write In at Scandling Center. They wanted to stress the way the Executive Order impacts the international academic community, in addition to immigrants and refugees.

“The sit in was to protest the unjust rulings and executive orders by the Trump administration. It was done in silence to reflect that even if you are silent you can get your message heard and raise your voice. The fact that the executive orders had negative impacts on international students coming back into the United States to return to their studies is something worth to be concerned about, along with the refugee crisis.” – Shafi Shirzai H’17

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Lunar New Year 2017

The Chinese New Year in modern Mainland China is an important Chinese festival celebrated at the turn of the traditional lunisolar Chinese calendar. In 2017, the first day of the Chinese New Year was on Saturday, the 28th of January, initiating the year of the Rooster.

The New Year festival was traditionally a time to honor deities as well as ancestors. Chinese New Year is celebrated in countries and territories with significant Chinese populations, as it’s a major holiday for the Chinese and has had influence on the lunar new year celebrations of its geographic neighbors.

Within China, regional customs and traditions of the celebration of the Chinese New Year vary widely. The evening preceding New Year’s day is an occasion for Chinese families to gather for the annual reunion dinner. It’s traditional for every family to thoroughly cleanse the house, in order to sweep away any ill-fortune and to make way for good incoming luck. Windows and doors will be decorated with red color paper-cuts and couplets with popular themes of “good fortune” or “happiness,” “wealth” and “longevity.” Other activities include lighting firecrackers and giving money in red paper envelopes.

Students on the HWS campus celebrated at the Asian Student Union’s Lunar New Year semi-formal dinner and dance on Saturday, January 28. HWS students and three clubs from Cornell University all performed at the event, and enjoyed dinner from Wing Tai restaurant.

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Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement. He is known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs. At the age of thirty-five, MLK Jr. was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement. In 1968 while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march, he was assassinated. People commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. by celebrating his life and achievements on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, January 16. Communities such as Geneva, NY and HWS come together to honor his legacy, such as the series of events this January. There is a march that takes place in downtown Geneva followed by a worship service at the Presbyterian Church and a speaker, William Johnson, former mayor of Rochester, NY. Also, there was an HWS Day of Service in MLK Jr.’s honor where HWS students volunteered to help members in the community.

Screening of “13th”

Tuesday, January 24 at 7pm, join us in the Sanford Room for a screening of Ava Duvernay’s documentary “13th.” Following the screening, Professor Justin Rose of the Political Science department will lead a conversation on race and the U.S. criminal justice system.

MLK Dance Program

A multicultural dance event titled, “Building the Beloved Community: Social Change through the Performing Arts” was hosted by Assistant Professor of Dance Kelly Johnson in the Gearan Center for the Performing Arts. The Niema Atkins and Afreesoul Dynamic Dance Company, a group of intersectional artists, will showcase their craft of spoken word and storytelling, movement and dance, video and film, as well as music and soundscapes.

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Fulbright Forum

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Fulbright Language Teaching Assistants Roxana Nabati and Malik Al-Masoodi presented on the Gilman International Scholarship and Fulbright Teaching Assistants Program.  The Gilman Scholarship Program is an undergraduate grant program for U.S. citizens of limited financial means to enable them to study abroad, thereby internationalizing their outlook and better preparing them to thrive in the global economy.

“In general, these scholarships offer a wonderful experience for any applicant because one will visit a new country, meet new people, make new friends, and experience a new culture, language, and traditions. To be more precise, one will see things from a different perspective, an authentic one, away from media. Consequently, one will make their own judgments  about the place they visit. It will definitely open wider horizons and changes the way one used to think. It is an adventure that young students have always been looking for and is worth trying, not to mention grant benefits, every students can apply free of charge.” –Malik Al-Masoodi, Arabic FLTA

Immigration: Voices and Identities

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Monday, December 5 in the Bartlett Theatre, HWS hosted a forum on immigration entitled, Immigration: Voices and Identities. The event featured a panel of students and faculty, including Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Sociology Ervin Kosta, Nagina Ahmadi ’20, Kely Amejecor ’18, John Camara ’19 and Sergio Perez ’19. The closing remarks were provided by Alejandra Castillo ’20. Through the lens of immigration, the panel examined various reasons for immigration, stereotypes and race, feelings of homesickness, and the challenges of encountering new customs and cultures.

International Game Night at the Chaplain’s

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Friday, October 28 at 7pm, the Chaplain invited HWS students to attend a game night where he provided desserts and snacks. There were a variety of games and he invited students to bring games and teach others. He also had Karaoke and mah jong.

“Improv is fun!! The dynamic activities cross all cultures. When 20 international and American students gathered for International Game Night they started by creating a human machine, enlivened by sound and movement. That was just the warm up led by Andrew D’Angio-White who has performed with improv troupes in Rochester, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Although most of the group had not done improv before, they created sketches that had everyone laughing harder than Saturday Night Live! Held at the start of Halloween weekend at the Chaplain’s House, Game Night also featured games and karaoke songs from around the world. We’ll repeat it on Friday, Nov 18 since everyone had fun making friends.  Thanks to Lan Yao and Bex Czajkowski and many other people who made it possible, including the instructors and students of CTL’s writing classes and conversation partners , the Intercultural Center, Peer to Peer, CGE’s Global Buddies, International Student Affairs, International Students Association and Office for Spiritual Engagement.” Clifford Chan, International Student Programming (Volunteer)

Kwanzaa

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Kwanzaa is a secular festival observed by many African Americans from December 26 to January 1 as a celebration of their cultural heritage and traditional values. People celebrate by feasting and giving gifts to loved ones.

This holiday was first created by Maulana Karena and celebrated in 1966-67. Karena founded the seven principles of Kwanzaa, and each of the seven days of Kwanzaa is each dedicated to one.

  1. Umoja (Unity): To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race
  2. Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define and name ourselves, as well as to create and speak for ourselves
  3. Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems and work together to solve them
  4. Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses, and use these to profit from them together
  5. Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness
  6. Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it
  7. Imani (Faith): To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

The Kwanzaa celebratory items include a mat (Mkeka) on which a Kinara (candle holder), Mishumaa Saba (seven candles), maze (crops), Muhindi (corn), a Kikombe cha Umoja (unity cups) for commemorating and giving shukrani (thanks) to African Ancestors, and Zawadi (gifts). These all represent values and concepts reflective of African culture and contribution to community building and reinforcement of culture.

Native American Heritage Month

November is Native American Heritage Month, a time to celebrate rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories, as well as acknowledge the important contributions of Native people.

We are so lucky to have tribes near Geneva, NY, including the Iroquois. The Iroquois were not one tribe, but a group of five different tribes, consisting of the Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida and Mohawk. They lived near each other and spoke very similar languages. They lived in what is now New York State along the St. Lawrence River, and their village consisted of two or more longhouses.

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Culture Through the Arts

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HWS celebrated culture though the arts this past Tuesday, October 18. David Lahmani H’17 hosted the event and announced the various performances beginning at 5:30pm. The day began with an open exhibit of street art from abroad, and then later in the evening students performed their dance routines in the Scandling Center.

It was very rewarding to see the great talent our students have and how well they showcased their work according to this year’s theme – Street Art! Darling Polanco-Wattles, Assistant Director, Intercultural Affairs

Panel on Islamophobia

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There was an on-campus panel discussion regarding the rise of islamophobia in the United States. Professor Shalahudin Kafrawi in the Religious Studies department was the moderator of the discussion, and five student panelists participated. The moderator asked questions regarding the students’ Muslim identities and their experiences with islamophobia. This event was sponsored by the Office of Diversity & Inclusion, and Intercultural Affairs.

The islamophobia panel was a great opportunity to hear firsthand from Muslim students about their experiences on campus as well as the broader issue of Islamophobia plaguing our nation and the world. Salome Rose, Interim Chief Diversity Officer

HWS Impact

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Several campus offices have collaborated to host HWS Impact, a day of dialogue devoted to exploring issues of identity, engagement, justice, leadership and social change at the Colleges.

“HWS Impact is designed as a platform for students to engage in collective exploration of our campus culture through conversation,” says Denise Polanco ’11. “Ultimately, our goal is to provide the community with a unique opportunity to create a shift in the campus culture and support the goals of the Culture of Respect initiative.”

The first portion of the event features student storytellers sharing personal narratives about the ways in which their identities have impacted their college experiences. Following the personal narratives — which are themed around race, class, gender, ethnicity, nationality, religion, ability, power and privilege — the second portion provides an opportunity for attendees to debrief the stories through dialogue groups. The groups allow an environment where students feel empowered to engage in action-oriented conversations about issues that impact or affect the campus community.

HWS Impact has grown in collaborations and was able to reach wider audiences across campus. The narrators  were very impactful and widened different perspectives touching on important topics affecting the HWS community. Denise Polanco, Program Coordinator at Student Activities

Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month

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Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestor came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

September 15 is a significant date because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. Also, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September 18, respectively. Columbus Day (Día de la Raza) is October 12 which also falls within this 30 day period.

International Student Dinner

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The President and Mrs. Gearan’s hosted their 18th annual event and welcomed our international students. Students were invited for dinner to meet one another, and become acquainted with Mr. and Mrs. Gearan. HWS is a true global community, and this dinner is only one example of the ways we incorporate our students from all over the world.

Convocation

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Convocation is a wonderful event which brings the entire campus community together to celebrate the start of the academic year. During this event, students, faculty, staff and alums gather on the Stern Lawn to reflect on the values of the Colleges and remember traditions from the past. The ceremony always begins with a traditional bagpipe-led processional, as the lawn was lined with 102 flags representing the nations and terrorizes from which the colleges’ students and faculty are from, and where they’ve studied.

Present Mark Gearan welcomed the students of the Class of 2020, and made sure to advise them to “take advantage of every day here, take advantage of every faculty and staff member here, who are here for you. And take advantage of our web of alums and parents who are dedicated to your success, for this is a very special place and you will make it an even better place.”

Vipe President for diversity and Community Engagement at The University of Texas at Austin Dr. Gregory J. Vincent ’83 delivered the Keynote address. The Chair of the Board of Trustees, Thomas S. Bozzuto ’68 and the Professor of Geoscience Nan Crystal Arens, the recipient of the 2015-2016 Faculty Prize for Scholarship, also both spoke, offering a welcome and advise for the Class of 2020.

The two Student Trustees, Sydney Gomez WS’17, and Zachary Grattan H’17, both spoke as well.

Club Expo

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The Club Expo this past September 3rd was an Involvement Fair hosted on the Quad. Different clubs on campus set up their own table to promote their club and find new members. Many students attended and learned about the different ways to get involved on campus and signed up to join different clubs.